Molly Bloom’s Soliloquy

Molly Bloom’s soliloquy refers to the eighteenth, and final, “episode” of James Joyce‘s novel Ulysses in which the thoughts of Molly Bloom are presented in contrast to the previous narrators, Leopold Bloom and Stephen Dedalus Molly’s physicality is often contrasted with the intellectualism of the male characters, Stephen Dedalus in particular.

Joyce’s novel presented the action with numbered “episodes” rather than named chapters. Most critics since Stuart Gilbert, in his James Joyce’s Ulysses, have named the episodes and they are often called chapters. The final chapter is referred to as “Penelope”, after Molly’s mythical counterpart. One major difference between Molly and Penelope is that while Penelope is eternally faithful, Molly is not, having an affair with Hugh ‘Blazes’ Boylan after ten years of her celibacy within the marriage (though some critics, including Gilbert, point out that the celibacy of Penelope is questionable).

In the course of the monologue, Molly accepts Leopold into her bed, frets about his health, and then reminisces about their first meeting and about when she knew she was in love with him. The final words of Molly’s reverie, and the very last words of the book, are:

“…I was a Flower of the mountain yes when I put the rose in my hair like the Andalusian girls used or shall I wear a red yes and how he kissed me under the Moorish wall and I thought well as well him as another and then I asked him with my eyes to ask again yes and then he asked me would I yes to say yes my mountain flower and first I put my arms around him yes and drew him down to me so he could feel my breasts all perfume yes and his heart was going like mad and yes I said yes I will Yes. “

Advertisements

One thought on “Molly Bloom’s Soliloquy

  1. Pingback: A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man | Peter J Verdil

Leave a comment here

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s